Star Trek Pop Culture

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Star Trek Pop Culture

Postby jayphailey » Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:38 am

What music do they listen to in the 24th century?

What authors have really spoken to people in the 350 years until then?

What art do they enjoy?

how do they talk to themselves about how they see their world and their place in it?

The great thing is you can make up things all day and not fill this particular barrel.
"A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" - Leonard Nimoy

"Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted." - Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Re: Star Trek Pop Culture

Postby jayphailey » Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:38 am

Bargooli and Parnak

In Jay Trek generally Holodeck adventures have replaced the slot movies occupy in our culture. There are still video and holographic presentations, as well as written word articles, stories and novels.


The main difference is that the limitation is holodeck technology and your audience. The participant or participants take the roll of protagonist in your story.

The ones people like have good story lines, interesting challenges and puzzles and a certain amount of action required. It involves them.

But this is a whole different type of story telling than we're used to and it will have whole different rules and genre conventions.

As the technology matured, a number of people became prominent at designing holographic presentations of various kinds.

Bargooli turned up Early on in the Modern Holodeck era. Bargooli's thing was to recreate classic works of art, as holographic scenes. Early efforts were centered on painstaking recreations of classic art, as if you'd just stepped into a painting, but there wasn't much detail to the surrounding world.

As Bargooli grew the worlds contained in the paintings deepened and became commentaries on the culture both of the oriiginal artist and that of the people viewing the work.

Consensus was that Bargooli was an art historian or art curator.

Debate still rages on whether or not Bargooli's holograms count as homages or works of art on their own.

Parnak: Parnak was an early holodeck adventure writer. His works were popular and many are still played. Parnak had a gift for creating interesting and unusual puzzles and challenges for players as well as complex story lines for players to follow. While limited by early holodecks, Parnak was able to use these limits to enhance his stories in ways that are now considered Holodeck story design 101.

Parnak's output was never high, but he often released notes to "co-writers" and allowed them to make sequels and extensions to existing stories.

In this way Parnak helped develop a new generation of Holodeck creators who continued it as an engaging entertainment form.

In 2373 there was a minor scandal when it was discovered that Bargooli and Parnak were the same person. Maria JonSchmidt, a teacher at a local college in Vienna was both Bargooli and Parnak, names she picked off an old directory.

Since she was outed, JonSchmidt frequently combined her two passions, making interesting and amusing holodeck scenarios which feature occasional recreations of classic art pieces.

She explained in an interview that her Bargooli works were about studying, appreciating and commenting on art, as well as being a sort of 3 dimensional jigsaw puzzle to recreate the scenes depicted in art pieces, with the proper lighting and textures to recreate the look.


But Parnak was just her having fun with narrative structure and multitasking by incorporating her exercise routines into them.

She used Pseudonyms to able to more effectively compartmentalize the various zones of her life, and was somewhat put out that the Holodeck creator community dug her up.

In time she acccepted this and continues to work.

Some enthusiasts claim that all of her works are connected by a deeper meta narrative, but JonSchmidt denies this. "I am the underlying thread. I am the meta narrative. I had no conscious desire to link my holodeck stories together. In fact, I would have rejected the idea if proposed."

Her output has slowed in recent years, but her stories and art recreations are growing more subtle and thoughtful.

Every so often, she releases a shallow, energetic and fun "Action/Adventure" story which seem to be about blowing off steam.

At least one features all the characters of classic art coming to life and chasing the player through a nightmarish mega-museum. No hidden depths here, just running, jumping and punching Renaissance people in the face.
"A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" - Leonard Nimoy

"Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted." - Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Re: Star Trek Pop Culture

Postby JM1776 » Sun Oct 29, 2017 5:51 am

I actually understand why she was put out. You don't need to freakin' know who someone is to enjoy their work or support their position. It's none of your damned business if someone wants to be anonymous.

I'd probably end up in prison if someone outed me, because I'd seek them out and punch them in the face. There's just something dickish about doing that. There just is.

Good stuff. I tend to make that kind of reference, such as the Tal Aren Th'ya (or Tallarenthia in Federation Standard), a historical fantasy written on Vulcan a generation before the awakening of Surak, which nevertheless is still held almost universally as one of Vulcan's great literary works, roughly analogous to Tolkien's The Silmarillion, and with which it is often compared. I refer to it in Nature of the Beast.
The fascination with zombies in modern entertainment has a great deal to do with the fact that most of us are precisely that.
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Re: Star Trek Pop Culture

Postby jayphailey » Sun Oct 29, 2017 1:00 pm

Nice!
"A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" - Leonard Nimoy

"Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted." - Ralph Waldo Emerson
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Re: Star Trek Pop Culture

Postby JM1776 » Sun Oct 29, 2017 1:27 pm

From Nature of the Beast:

To his astonishment, T'Vaar's next words were in the singsong cadence of Sah’riva, the ancient Vulcan dialect used today only by poets and seers. Mantovanni recognized the piece—it was the call to arms from Sanak's Tallarenthia—and he was stunned that she would honor him with a comparison to such ancient heroes:

“Arise now, captain of men, for dire is the need of your kin
Do not lie brooding and hidden from the sun
“Take up your cause and banner
For no other man may do what must be done
“And you are he who dares, my lord, the silent blade above the din.”


She returned to Federation Standard.

“Sir, you were raised among us, and you know that the Adepts of T'Pel do not speak lightly; but I forebode, in the old way, that Parihn is in greater danger than even she knows—a danger not just to her freedom and life, but the continuation of her very spirit.

“And she is alone.”

T'Vaar raised her hand, and saluted him in the Vulcan fashion.

“Peace and long life, Captain.”


I seem unable to write like that anymore.
The fascination with zombies in modern entertainment has a great deal to do with the fact that most of us are precisely that.
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Re: Star Trek Pop Culture

Postby jayphailey » Sun Oct 29, 2017 3:00 pm

I know how that feels. I haven't written anything sizable since 2009.

I don't know what to say except to be encouraging to you. When the thing that needs to be said is there, you'll say it.

Our writing styles change and evolve over time as we do. I'd suggest that you read stuff. Read stuff from people you like, and also your old stuff.

I know my writing is coming closer to the surface when I go back and reread my own stuff.

But maybe Joe NOW sounds different and maybe figuring out that voice is what's stalling you?

Or you, know... not, what the Eff do I know?
"A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" - Leonard Nimoy

"Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted." - Ralph Waldo Emerson
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